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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
in budget talks. here are the numbers to call. if you can also find us online. here is the headline in "the new york times." the pew center has a new study out called "the impact on the fiscal cliff on states." here is what it says. we would do more into these and how they will specifically affect states on an individual basis. there is a question on whether the fiscal cliff would hurt. it says -- our question for you this morning is whether the states should have a stake of in negotiations. looking more in the story "the new york times." it says -- some of the benefits states could receive, nobody is retained that president obama and republicans in congress will fail to reach an accord because they feel -- they fear that the resulting combination of spending cuts and tax increases could prompt another recession, which their states can ill afford. let's go to houston, texas and hear from barry. caller: high. host: am i:should sit seven role in the negotiations? we are hearing about how republicans and president obama are negotiating. caller: i think the democrats should have some form of a
you do instead of dealing with the policy issues. we have have a very distinguished member with us, a good friend of all of us, someone who deals seriously with policy issues and is joined us today and that would be january from illinois. >> also i think today of most significance i believe is my role on the intelligence committee. all of us were given a briefing based on emerging information from the intelligence committee . susan rice, i do -- susan rice went on television based on the information that was available at the time and the briefing that she was given information and intelligence that she had no part in collecting. the kind of statement that is anyone who had been given those briefings would have made in public. obviously, this was on an unclassified buys sis but she was given information that she had that has subsequently been updated. it was not wrong or deliberately misleading in any way. there had been the belief that there had been a protest that developed into this attack. so susan rice as the president very clearly said, if anyone has a problem with the intelli
. in naples us to perform registry's in order to collect data. -- it enables us to perform registry's in order to collect data. >> is team cancer more prevalent in europe than in the usa? >> it is very difficult to get numbers from the west. in britain every day there are six teenagers who get the bad news. and based on our figures in using your population, it would be about 30 per day, 30 families per day that are going through hell. notour system there's anything like a teenager. there are children, and after the age of 12, they are adults. when you ask about if we will do any research, it is the fact that we have a group that you can study, and then you would focus the madison. you will learn more about the cancers. and america, they do not exist. your numbers are all heaped together. apparently at the moment there are 70,000 per year it must be 30. >> is it easier to do clinical trials on teenagers and young children? are the ethical issues lower? >> i believe it is more difficult to give -- to do the research. they tend to be underinsured. they tend to sometimes have no insurance. love it
for joining us here on the "full court press" as we tackle the big stories of the day here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe and give you a chance to sound off. tell us what these issues mean to you at 1-866-55-press. boy, president obama has an interesting guest for lunch today at the white house. none other than mitt romney himself. tagg, by the way was not invited. there will be no reporters or no photographs allowed either and of course, no alcohol. the white house would not say what their luncheon agenda is but they did release the luncheon menu. mitt romney will be served a healthy helping of crow. and it's about time. all right. we'll talk about that and a whole lot more here. a lot more serious stuff here on the "full court press" this morning. first, standing by with all of the latest, lisa ferguson out in los angeles. hi lisa. good morning. >> hey bill. good morning everyone. the president does have quite an interesting schedule with his lunch guest but first off he's meetin
elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
are the voters trying to tell us? and not even nate did definitively answer that. here's what we do know. voters turned out for president barack obama in droves. despite having a somewhat smaller electoral map than in 2008, this is one of the biggest democratic wins since fdr. with florida now colored blue, the president had secured a wide electoral surplus and a sizable popular vote margin. now, the popular vote win was made possible by people who lined up in huge numbers to vote in states like louisiana or new york or south carolina, which weren't in play in terms of their electoral votes. they weren't going to be needed. but who were nonetheless determined to cast their ballots for the president. as a result, this president's win was bigger than jfk's in 1960, bigger than richard nixon in 1968, bigger than jimmy carter's in 1976 and bigger than george w. bush's in 2000. no denying it. it was a big win. and as i said before, size does matter. at least when it comes to laying claim to a mandate. so the president may have earned political capital, but what is he going to say about the argument f
and democratic attorney general. one of our two u.s. senators was an independent, elected twice. an independent missed winning the governorship by 15,000 votes over a million passed in 1973. we were the ticket splitting capital of america. we have cents settled back into partisan voting with the rest of america. this is a very polarized era. having said that, when you have close elections you still have a band of voters who will mix and match on the ballot, either because they want to mix and match or they are simply reacting to the individual candidates. in the case of romney and kaine, i have personally been in situations where straw votes were taken among large groups and you generally find you have 3, 4, 5% of the romney boaters picking tim kane for various reasons. some of these romney voters are more moderate republicans and the like tim kane better than his opponent. are there similar voters for obama and george allen? i am sure there are. i never met one of them. but i will say this -- george allen, despite what happened in 2006, he has won from time to time in running for statewide off
in staten island. most of the northeast are used to this and equipped, but hurricane hurricane sandy is making it difficult . debris from sandy is evident. cars on top of one another . boats in the sides of commome covered in no and along the streets debris as well which is another issue. folks don't know what is under it. twisted metal and nails and boards. here's what residents are dealing with. >> it is insane. 10 days now and now shoveling snow. >> you still don't have power? >> no power, no gas, no nothing. >> early this morning, 293,000 homes and businesses in new york state without power and 403,000 in new jersey . s cancelled 1300 flights out of the metropolitan area and some mandatory evacuations were put in place. new york mayor bloomburg didn't choose to do so . people deciding to stay with their belongings for fear of looting . we are getting some reports, that new york governor andrew cuomo fired his emergency management director for diverting a crew for coming to his own driveway to pick up a tree. good news for folks in this region. they are happy to hear this. tempera
. you could use any of these terms. alexander hamilton used the term representative democracy. so we're a government that is based on majority rule and consent, but that is limited by a constitution. hence, this compound regime. now, one of the major charges that the american colonists raised against king george iii in the declaration of independence was about sovereignty. i'll read that charge. he, that's george iii, has combined with others to summit us to a jurisdiction -- to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution and unacknowledged by our laws, giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation. now, of course, the constitution he was referring to, obviously, in 1776 was the british constitution. the ancient constitution. but they were looking for some foreign jurisdiction that was going to have authority over us. we're going to examine the ideas and practices of those who in our time have combined with others to subject us or to attempt to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution. well, ideas have consequences as we learned long ago from a
, a debate among candidates for the senate seat. this hourlong debate is brought to us by wmtw tv in portland, maine. >> in the next hour, you will hear from six candidates who want to represent the maine in the senate. i want to give you a quick word about our format tonight. the questions come from our editorial board and viewers and e-mails. we want to hear from you. >> we already have good questions coming in. this is your chance to ask the senate candidates in you think you want -- candidates anything you want. >> the candidates will have one minute to answer the questions. rebuttal will be at the moderator's discretion. we will be going in on alphabetical order and starting with opening statements from each candidate. we will begin with the independent candidate. this debate along with the other debates, you will not get much detail. i urge you all to go to ever 1's website. -- everyone's website. i hope you will go to the other outidates' websites to find what they have to say on the issues. the reason i am running for the united states senate is that i spent 25 years working for the f
. >> he brought us the company from an action the epa took, and epa was told by the chamber of commerce that if you took that action if you voted not to suspend the rules, they would not have to prevent it. that is the problem. you see bureaucrats are dictating policy in montana. we can do just fine. >> the congressman has talked about 95% and other things that are patently false. they said they could deal with these rules. the problem they have is with ash and hayes. they can meet those standards. they have chosen to make investments in latin america, not in montana. we have been here before, and that is not the way it should be. a company that does not pay $45 million in taxes to the state of montana. they are manipulating not only their workers but the congressman on this decision. >> time to go to our panel. our first question goes to senator tester. >> thank you. an overwhelming concern is the negative ads, so are the negative ads toward you buy your opponents greeted with one -- net so of the negative ads toward you buy your opponents, which one bothers you most? >> we have unlimi
want to show you. in november to the us and 8, do you think the country will be better off or worse off for years from now? -- in november 2008, do you think the country will be better off or worse off four years from now? 54% said better off. 41% said worse off. the pessimism has grown but overall americans are optimistic about the future and the next four years. that is what we want to ask you about. are you optimistic about america's future? of course, you can contact us via social media. our twitter handled is @cspanwj. another question that was asked in both 2008 and 2012 -- this year, 69% said americans are divided, 29% said united. a few more of those results. this is the percentage of americans who think it is extremely important that president obama accomplished the following. across the board, all americans in gray, democrats in blue, republicans in red. number three, for all americans, second for democrats, and four four republicans. make major cuts in federal spending came in at number 5 for all americans. those are some of the results of the poll that was taken november 9 t
.8%, the unemployment rate, from september. showing 171,000 jobs added in october, this according to the u.s. bureau of labor statistics this morning. i want to get your quick reaction to those numbers. guest: first of all, that is virtually no change. yes, it is an uptick, and it was down the month before. but unemployment is staying basically around 8%. if you count the people of -- who have given up looking for jobs in this country, we have over 20 million people who are unemployed right now. we have to address their needs and concerns, and make sure they have jobs over the next four years. by producing 12 million jobs, a lot of these people will be put back to work. if we continue the policies of the last four years, i am afraid we will see the next norm for unemployment in this country will be 8%, and the unemployment figures are going to stay around that 20 million figure. i think we can do a lot better. i think governor romney certainly has a program to do that, he and certainly in ohio we have proven that it can be done. host: let us go to judith, on the democratic line. you are on. caller:
you very much for being with us here. >> thank you. it is good to be with you. >> what are you looking for tuesday? what are you keeping an eye on? >> everyone in journalism is looking at ohio. just like the candidates are examining ohio very closely. we're also looking very carefully at virginia in colorado. we did talk about virginia. trying to figure out these very close state. iowa was a state we have been watching. ohio looks like it is going more gracefully toward president obama. we will see that holds up by election night. then all those building blocks are to build after that. we are doing the same sort of examination that everybody is doing. >> 1 poll shows this dead heat. democrats are saying the republicans are chasing fulls gold. >> you have to wonder if it is a little too late there is definitely a hurricane santeedy element to all of this. that could definitely be something that even though you do not want to politicize a disaster, you could be looking at a lot of democratic voters are not coming to the polls because they cannot are they have other things going on. that
greece, bigger than spain that his party left us. and i have to say i find it completely inexplicable why the party opposite that says they want those with the broadest backs to share some of the burden oppose the idea of taking a child benefit away from people over 60, 70, 80, 90,000. i don't see why the front bench sitting there should go on collecting their child benefit when we're having to make so many other difficult decisions. >> [inaudible] >> thank you, mr. speaker. will my right honorable friend join me in con develop late -- congratulating douglas -- [inaudible] in my constituency on their queen's award or while successfully supporting -- [inaudible] does he agree with me that that is a fine example of british business on the up and, indeed, the best of -- [inaudible] >> i think the honorable lady makes a very important point. we need to have export-led growth in this country, we need a rebalancing in this country. that is what the increase in manufacturing and export production is all about, but we need to go further and faster and, that >> you have been watching british prime
of new england. tom kierein now is tracking that storm. good morning to you. >> a near miss for us thankfully, because it is a powerful coastal storm, almost like a hurricane. in fact, it had hurricane force winds yesterday afternoon. and now it's just sort of stalled out and spinning away here, just south of nantucket. and they're still getting bands of heavy snow from maine all the way down to massachusetts and into western connecticut. this part of central western connecticut, the areas that have the most snow, up to a foot of the wind-driven heavy snow. still snowing in long island. along new york city, they had up to six to seven inches of snow as well as much of new jersey. and now locally on our radar, we had just a few areas of some flurries, a little bit of sleet activity, some sprinkles. that's pretty much ended, just getting a sprinkle here, northeastern maryland. south of salisbury getting a few flurries now, and temperatures are above freezing thankfully. but it is cold. upper 30s, wind gusting to around 15 miles an hour will increase during the afternoon, gusting 25 t
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)